Black Queer Experience and Regeneration in The Watermelon Woman and Brother to Brother
Reception Analysis of the Movie Champion For Us
September , 2019
The Use of Epistolarity for Documenting the Past in Films From Turkey
September , 2019
Language en
Subjects Art
Journal Section Features
Authors

Orcid: 0000-0003-2111-6515
Author: Serdar KÜÇÜK (Primary Author)
Institution: İSTANBUL GELİŞİM ÜNİVERSİTESİ, İKTİSADİ, İDARİ VE SOSYAL BİLİMLER FAKÜLTESİ, İNGİLİZ DİLİ VE EDEBİYATI BÖLÜMÜ
Country: Turkey


Dates Publication Date : October 30, 2019

Since the early 1990s, a strong preoccupation with history has been one of the defining features of queer cinema. Many filmmakers, including Derek Jarman and Tom Kalin, have revisited and rewritten official histories, and many others incessantly continue to do so with the aim of constructing a new future via the powerful medium of cinema. Against obliteration by two oppressive historicisms at once, i.e., white and straight, black queer filmmakers Marlon Riggs and Isaac Julien have embraced the same method in postmodern terms in Tongues Untied (1989) and Looking for Langston (1989) in the earlier phase of the so-called Queer New Wave. Following in their footsteps, Cheryl Dunye and Rodney Evans have carried the tradition to a new level with The Watermelon Woman (1996) and Brother to Brother (2004) in such a way that is still unconventional in form, yet more radical in content. In the following textual analyses, it is argued that both filmmakers not only manipulate history but also posit filmmaking as a means of hope and regeneration for black lesbians and gays of the United States, deploying blackness and queerness provocatively to problematize sanctioned identities of race, gender, and sexuality.

black, queer, cinema, Cheryl Dunye, Rodney Evans

English